The new Facebook Graph Search – part 2

This blogpost is inspired by @djnemec‘s Github gist, which you can find here https://gist.github.com/nemec/2ba8afa589032f20e2d6509512381114. The next step In this part, we’re talking about combining searches. Just like in part 1, we will be translating JSON to Base64. And of course we’ll take you through it step by step 🙂 What to combine? Well, you can only combine when you stay in the same category. In … Continue reading The new Facebook Graph Search – part 2

Making Sense of OSINT Cell Tower Data for DFIR

For OSINT and digital forensic practitioners, we can grab cell phone tower information from the mobile devices we image and cross-reference those towers with the tower’s physical location. When we combine this data with the date and time of the device owner’s activities, we can better understand where the device (and the owner) were at given times. Continue reading Making Sense of OSINT Cell Tower Data for DFIR

twitter searching

Muting the Twitter algorithm and using basic search operators for better OSINT research

In July 2019 Twitter had some updates to their interface, search-URLs and overall user-experience. They changed a lot of things in the background which made the user-experience for researchers less useful. Actually a tweet thread started by @thegrugq inspired me to write this blog. With this blog you can take a few basic steps to bring back the user experience of “the old” Twitter like … Continue reading Muting the Twitter algorithm and using basic search operators for better OSINT research

Basics of Breach Data

Guest blog by Rob Volkert In 2018 there were reportedly 1,244 data breaches totaling over 446 million exposed records, primarily targeting the business sector and health care fields. Cyber security systems may be growing more sophisticated, but so too are attacks designed to collect personal data. There may be a silver lining to breach data for those of us who conduct open source intelligence (OSINT) … Continue reading Basics of Breach Data

Geometry in Image Forensics

The other day I was tagged in a conversation between @WebBreacher and Nick Furneaux, where Nick asked whether it would be possible to calculate the position of a person within a photo. A quick search on the internet returned multiple blogs and websites with calculations based on the size of the camera sensor. But this would only work if an original and uncropped photo was … Continue reading Geometry in Image Forensics